Posted in Books

Free for the next 5 days!

This is the first book in the Catalyst Series of clean cowboy romances. These are short romances, most of them are a little over 100 pages; perfect for reading on your lunch hour (or a few lunch hours, depending on how fast you read). Here’s a synopsis:

To B&B or not to B&B. That is the question for Bethany. She’s lost her boyfriend, her apartment, and her job. Catrina gives her an airplane ticket to Idaho to work for someone who wants to start a new bed and breakfast. A baker at heart, Bethany leaps at the opportunity to leave the city behind her and soon finds herself surrounded by pristine mountains.

Her new boss welcomes her warmly but his son, Beau, reacts to her in the opposite extreme. He’s adamant that a B&B will never work. His antagonistic attitude to the whole plan and his desire to send Bethany packing puts her in a tailspin.

When Beau turns into a recluse, Bethany asks about his background and discovers he’s been badly abused. She decides she must help him, and requests that he teach her how to ride a horse. When she suffers a concussion due to a freak accident, which he believes is his fault, Beau has a change of heart.

Posted in Books

Calling all Readers . . .

Anybody want to be an ARC reader for a newbie author? I create clean romances, featuring a western/cowboy theme, and I include as much comedy as will comfortably fit into the story. If you’re interested, let me know, and be sure to mention whether you’d prefer ebook or paperback.

Posted in This and That

“Stop Right There!”

There are a lot of things I’m trying to get used to, staying in the same house with my three grandchildren. Living alone as a grandma is quite a bit different than being in the same home with your grandkids (as you can well imagine, I’m sure). After many years of living by myself, it’s a bit of an adjustment. Even though I know I’ve forgotten a lot of the antics of my own children, I can at least remember that they were very similar to my grandkids, and this fact frequently makes me chuckle.

The last few days, my five-year-old grandson has taken to carrying a toy machine gun around the house and when he sees anyone, he points the weapon and says (loudly), “Stop right there!” It’s one thing to be fully awake when you hear this so you can react appropriately (hands in the air and a suitable facial expression), but I heard it the other day just after I woke up and was making my way down the hall to the bathroom. It took me a little by surprise (as I think the sun wasn’t even up yet) but I must say I appreciate his dedication to protecting the “castle” and the “princess” who lives here (his older sister).

Posted in This and That

A Few Nuggets from Grandchildren . . .

I’ve been staying with my daughter and her three children (ages 8, 5 and 2) for a few weeks now. One of my favorite things about being around young children is the amusing things they say. The other day my granddaughter and I were going for a walk and she was singing a song she’d learned at church, one I recognized, and when she got to the part where it goes, “at the cross of Calvary,” she sang, “at the cross of Calorie.” Oh my, what nuggets of joy and laughter children produce!

My daughter and her husband pray with their children every night before bed, and also sing a little song with them. The other night I happened to overhear part of their nighttime routine, and they were near the middle of the song when my daughter paused singing long enough to say: “You two, cut it out!” She then resumed her singing and finished the song along with the rest of the family. This grandma was overcome with giggles.

Posted in Books

A Fun Christmas Story . . .

. . . and a great last minute gift idea! Kindle or paperback, on sale for 99cents (Kindle) until the end of the year! (Synopsis below)

Celina is the director of a prestigious ballet school in Dallas. Her father passed away recently and her elderly mother is living all by herself on a ranch in Montana. The hired man just quit and she must find someone to run the ranch until they can sell it, and convince her mother to move back with her to the city.

Catrina’s Uncle Cody, from Book 1, leaves his cattle ranch in Idaho and goes to Montana to help take care of the ranch. When he learns of Celina’s predicament—that her mother refuses to leave—he begins hatching a plan to help her.

In despair, Celina decides she will have to quit her beloved teaching job in order to care for her mother. She returns to Dallas to finish teaching her final semester, planning to come back to Montana during spring break; but when she arrives at the ranch, she finds that the furniture and belongings are gone, and so is her mother!